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Self Injury Quick Reference


Self-injury is increasingly becoming a recognized problem in youth ministry, and all youth pastors and volunteer staff (in Jr. High, High School, and College Ministries) need a general understanding of self-injury, signs to look out for, and what to do if they become aware that a pupil is self-injuring.

Self-injury in middle and high school students should not be minimized or dismissed as “attention seeking” or “just a fad”. When people take the radical step of harming their bodies, they should be taken seriously and the sources of their stress addressed.” (Walsh, 2006, p.38)

Signs that someone is self-injuring:

People who self-injure often go to great lengths to conceal their injuries so it can be hard to know if a person does self-injure:

  • People who self-injure can seem withdrawn or depressed.
  • You may notice cuts or bruises that are always accompanied by excuses that don’t seem to fit.
  • Many people who self-injure will cut their arms and so they may wear long sleeves, even when it is very hot.
  • Within school pupils who self-injure may look for excuses not to have to wear shorts or short sleeves and therefore may avoid activities like PE or swimming.

Particularly where younger children are concerned it is important to keep a close eye on especially vulnerable pupils such as those with a history of abuse.

General advice for Youth Pastors and volunteers:

  • Listen to the student and try not to show them if you are angry, frustrated or upset. “Adults should learn that the best way to respond to common self-injury is with a ‘low-key, dispassionate demeanor’ and ‘respectful curiosity’ “(Walsh, 2006, p.245)
  • Learn about the difference between self-injury and suicide.
  • If someone tells you they self-injure it means they trust you and are willing to share this very personal problem.
  • Some people will just want to be heard and empathized with. Try not to push them by asking questions that may overwhelm them.

Ensure that your youth ministry has a self-harm policy – guidelines for writing a policy and further information can be found by emailing us at cschaffner@fringeconversations.com.

Things for Youth Pastors and volunteers to remember:

  • Anyone from any walk of life or any age can self-injure, including very young children.Self-injury affects people from all family backgrounds, religions, cultures and demographic groups.
  • Self-injury affects both males and females.
  • People who self-injure can often keep the problem to themselves for a very long time which means opening up to anyone about it can be difficult.
  • You can’t just tell someone who self-injures to stop – it is not that easy.
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Self-Injury Facebook Live Event with Youth Specialties


Here’s a thing we’re doing with Youth Specialties next Monday (8/22/16 from 3pm – 4pm CST).

Youth Specialties is hosting a live Q&A on their Facebook page on the topic of self-injury. Everyone is invited to participate. All you need in a device connected to the internet (smartphone, tablet, laptop). This is free to everyone that works with youth (parents, teachers, coaches, youth workers, etc.) We are hoping you could pass this on to your network and any others you think would benefit from this online event. We’ll be doing two more in September and October on addiction and suicide. We’ll keep you posted on those dates and times.

Until then, here’s a blog post I wrote for YS on self-injury. Take a few minutes are read up on the subject and then join us live next week.

Click here on Monday 8/22/16 for the Facebook Live Event.

Teen Self-Injury


Approximately 1% of the population has, at one time or another, used self-inflicted physical injury as a means of coping with an overwhelming situation or feeling.

Self-harm scares people. The behavior can be disturbing and difficult to understand, and it is often treated in a simplistic or sensational manner by the press. As a result, friends and loved ones of people who self-injure often feel frightened, isolated, and helpless. Sometimes they resort to demands or ultimatums as a way of trying to regain some control over the situation, only to see things deteriorate further.

The first step toward coping with self-injurious behavior is education: bringing reliable information about who self-injures, why they do it, and how they can learn to stop to people who self-injure and to their friends, loved ones, and medical caregivers. The following links will serve as a starting point for those interested in learning more about self-injury.

more…

New Training Opportunities For 2015/2016


trainingFringe workshops equip youth workers, parents, and students to understand the unique problems facing adolescents in today’s culture. These workshops will help the participants better understand the many issues related to the adolescent journey and enable them to provide the best care possible. Ultimately, we desire to provide a customized learning experience for those in attendance, based on your unique context.  We have four NEW training opportunities for 2015/2016.  Our schedule is filling up quickly so email us to nail down the training of your choice.

See our complete training list here.

new Helping Hurting Kids

Rates of depression and self injury continue to climb among adolescents every year.  Abuse and trauma seem to be standard experiences for many youth today.  As a youth worker it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of pain and suffering your students face.  This workshop will help you understand the best practices for walking alongside the teens in your community and how to be a catalyst for healing in their lives.

new Help, My Child Is Hurting

This parenting workshop is similar to the Helping Hurting Kids workshop but it aims to help the parents trying to navigate the complexity of their kids struggles.  The goal of this program is to give parents information on subjects like adolescent depression, self-injury, suicide, anxiety, eating disorder, abuse, and other challenging issues.  Parents will also walk away with a plan for getting the help their family needs as they begin the journey towards freedom and healing.

new The Art of Listening

The workshop focuses on developing the habit of Active Listening.  Listening well can be one of the most effective things you can do for a teen struggling to figure out life.  How well you listen will have a major impact on the quality of your relationships with those you serve and care about.  Listening well will also have an impact on how you manage conflict among your team/organization and provide you with a concrete tool to push through barriers and achieve your goals.

new Reimagining Adolescence

Kids growing up today are living in a world that is fundamentally different than the one their parents grew up in.  This poses challenges to even the most adept adult.  In this workshop you will discover the systemic cultural changes that are creating a whole new developmental experience for our kids as they attempt to find out their true identity and place of belonging.  Join us as we explore the developmental and spiritual challenges of raising adolescents in contemporary society.  This is a one day workshop for parents and/or youth workers.

Top 10 Most Read Blog Posts Of 2010


While trying to discern what information is being searched for and consumed the most we were able to identify topics that are in need of further exploration.  Our top 10 list of 2010 is not a self-congratulatory pat on the back but rather an attempt to guide our focus for 2011.

The following posts we our most read blog posts of 2010 and therefore the ones that revealed some of the areas of greatest need.

  1. The State of Male Adolescence Today
  2. 10 Things You Need To Know About Date Rape
  3. The Importance Of Harmonious Peer Relationship
  4. Forgiveness: A Leap Of Faith
  5. Teen Dating Violence
  6. Roles Of Children In Dysfunctional Families
  7. Self Injury Quick Reference
  8. Ten Strategies for Working with Boys
  9. Cognitive Distortions
  10. Basic Brain Function and Emotional Hijacking

It’s obvious to us that there is a great need for resources/information on working with and understanding young, developing boys, teen dating violence, self-injury, and understanding the brain of adolescents.  But we’d also like to hear from you about what topics, information, research we can provide so you can continue to grow in your capacity for loving and equipping young people to follow in the ways of Jesus.

From us to you and yours, prayers of blessings and gratitude for your support of Conversations on the Fringe in 2010.

Community Conversations


Fringe Community Conversations are collaborative community-based gatherings aimed at helping those that work with youth, parents, and students to understand the unique problems facing adolescents in today’s culture. These gatherings will help those in attendance better understand the many issues related to the adolescent journey and enable them to provide the best care possible. We host conversations, presentations, and workshops at schools, churches, and other youth serving organizations. Ultimately, we desire to provide a customized learning experience for those in attendance, based on your unique context, on the follow topics:


Effective Ministry To Marginalize Youth: Do you have a diverse group of kids? Do you want to be more effective in reaching a more diverse cross-section of youth in your community? Do you desire to impact the lives of LGBTQ youth, kids with disabilities, cross racial barriers, and get to know those who are strikingly different than you and those in your ministry? Do you desire to increase your cultural intelligence in order to build a bridge across the gap between your church and others? This training focuses on developing and increasing our cultural intelligence (CQ) in order to begin the bridge building process of learning how to love our neighbors that appear to be different that us.

Parenting In The Digital Age: If you’ve ever thought to yourself, “Being a teenager today isn’t any different than when I was a kid” then this workshop is for you. Changes in our technologically driven culture is influencing how our kids see the world, a world that is spinning faster than ever before. This generation has never known a world without the internet, social media, and mobile technology and this has impacted how they interact with the world around them, for better and for worse. Together we will explore these changes and how we can help our kids navigate the technologically-driven world they live in and are expected to thrive in.

Helping Hurting Kids: Rates of depression and self injury continue to climb among adolescents every year.  Abuse and trauma seem to be standard experiences for many youth today.  As a youth worker it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of pain and suffering your students face.  This workshop will help you understand the best practices for walking alongside the teens in your community and how to be a catalyst for healing in their lives.

Help, My Child Is Hurting: This parenting workshop is similar to the Helping Hurting Kids workshop but it aims to help the parents trying to navigate the complexity of their kids struggles.  The goal of this program is to give parents information on subjects like adolescent depression, self-injury, suicide, anxiety, eating disorder, abuse, and other challenging issues.  Parents will also walk away with a plan for getting the help their family needs as they begin the journey towards freedom and healing.

The Art of Conflict and Communication: The workshop focuses on developing the healthy communication habits, as well as positive conflict resolution skills for parents and teens.  Listening well can be one of the most effective things you can do for a teen struggling to figure out life.  How well we communicate will have a major impact on the quality of your relationships with those you serve and care about.  Listening well will also have an impact on how you manage conflict among your team/organization and provide you with a concrete tool to push through barriers and achieve your goals.

Reimagining Adolescence:  Kids growing up today are living in a world that is fundamentally different than the one their parents grew up in.  This poses challenges to even the most adept adult.  In this workshop you will discover the systemic cultural changes that are creating a whole new developmental experience for our kids as they attempt to find out their true identity and place of belonging.  Join us as we explore the developmental and spiritual challenges of raising adolescents in contemporary society. 

*Reimagining Adolescence is a one day workshop for parents and/or youth workers.

The Impact of Popular Culture: We’ve known intuitively for years of the impact popular culture has on developing teens.  This workshop explores the current cultural landscape and ways to “flip the script” and use culture to our advantage when trying to reach kids.  We’ll look at the music, art, mobile media, internet trends, and movie/television that youth consume and how they are consuming it.

Anger / Anxiety: This workshop looks at the unique stress response of men and women and the complications of having life controlling anger or anxiety. You will leave with an understanding of how anger and anxiety affect the quality of life as well as some simple strategies for managing both.

Depression / Suicide: Depression can be overwhelming to a young person.  In this workshop we will define what depression is and what it isn’t, we will look at the physiology of a depressed brain, adolescent development, signs and symptoms of depression, cause of depression, and how we can walk along side adolescents suffering from depression.  We will also take time to explore suicide and suicidal ideation.  We will learn how to increase protective factors that decrease the risk that a youth in our care will turn to suicide and how to protect ourselves from liability.

Self-Injury: Self-injury, although it may seem temporarily helpful, is ultimately a dangerous and futile coping strategy which interferes with intimacy, productivity and happiness. There is no “safe” or “healthy” amount of self-injury. Self-injury is not a compulsion which one is powerless over for a lifetime, people can and do stop injuring, with the right kinds of help and support. Self-injury can be transformed from a seemingly uncontrollable compulsion to a choice. In this session you will learn the risk-factors involved with SI and develop an arsenal of coping skills to aid those suffering from it.

Pornography: Exploring the impact the pornography has on culture and the individual.  Pornography changes the brain and how we experience sex.  Addiction to pornography is wrecking the lives of young people everywhere and they are oblivious to it.  This workshop provides details on how pornography impacts brain development and our ability to connect with people the way God intended.

Child Abuse: If you work/serve in ministry long enough you will encounter child abuse.  Most know that we need to report the abuse but many don’t know how to walk alongside the victims after the abuse has occurred.  This workshop will provide the audience with practical ideas to partner with young people as they begin the healing from abuse.

Human Behavior and the Functionality of Sin: Sin is a moral failure.  Most people won’t argue that.  But, what if it’s more that just a bad decision? What if the sin is actually a functional way of trying to deal with the cards you were dealt? What if sin is just another way to try and meet the emotional and relational needs we all have?  What if they learned other ways to meet those needs?  Would sin become less appealing?  That’s what we will look at in this workshop.

Youth with Disabilities: Youth with disabilities are often marginalized and pushed to the fringes of society.  This workshop will focus on the best practices for restoring teens with disabilities to full participation in the community.

Soul Care / Self Care: Do you feel like you give and give and give but are running on empty most days?  Do you feel like people take advantage of you and now you resent those you were called to serve?  Does your spiritual life get buried under the demands of ministry?  Are you overwhelmed with the amount of hurt and tragedy you see every day?  If so you may be in need of Soul Care.  Learn how to “keep your cup full while you pour out to others” through the practice of spiritual disciplines.  We need healthy youth workers so they can remain engaged in the kingdom work for the long haul.

Bullying: The term bullying sounds like a rite of passage that many youth go through but in reality bullying has life altering consequences for everyone involved.  This workshop will take a look at how an informed response to the bullying cycle can bring reconciliation and community to everyone involved.

Current Drug Trends: Slang terms, drug popularity, and methods and concealment of substance use change regularly. Anyone who spends a significant amount of time with young people should keep on top of these trends so that they can better identify and refer students who may require help. In this presentation, program participants will be updated on the latest significant drug trends, as well as signs and symptoms of use and where to go with concerns about a student.

Working with Criminally Active Youth: This workshop will address the issues related to working with adolescents involved in criminal behaviors, such as; drug using, drug dealing, gang related crime, theft, vandalism, violence, etc.  We will explore how God has wired us and what He wired us for as well as the intrinsic longings He placed in us to direct our behaviors.   We will learn about the pro-social vs. pro-criminal spectrum and how one becomes a criminal and disengages morally.  We will also discuss the criminogenic needs individuals have and how recidivism occurs when those needs aren’t addressed.  We will explore what developmental assets are and how they are related to criminality and how we as a church can participate in increasing the numbers of assets young people have.  We will explore how to develop a community network to address the various needs an individual has, such as; employment, housing, mental health, etc.  We will discuss mentoring and family ministry strategies that are proven to reduce recidivism and provide hope for individuals coming out of a criminal lifestyle and moving into a Kingdom lifestyle.

How to Talk to Your White, Middle-class, Straight, American, Christian, Teenager about Justice: How do we love those who intentionally/unintentionally benefit from their privilege and perpetuate the myth of “better than others”? How do we love those who oppress and marginalize vulnerable people groups? This workshop is part story and part conversation on how to navigate conversations with our “enemies”. Learn the story of an individual who grew up racist, bigoted, and with a sense of being better than everyone who was different than him. Learn how, through important relationship, experiences, and postures, this individual changed and became a friend and advocate for those he previously mistreated. Then, learn how to enter into these tense conversations with others to begin the work of reconciliation.

If you are interested in discussing the possibility of hosting a workshop/training just send us an email and we’ll work something out for you and your organization.

Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why Has The Teen World Buzzing


If you haven’t heard about the new Netflix series 13 Reasons Why you’ve been living under a rock. It’s all anyone is talking about right now. This series is based on the Jay Asher novel of the same name. This story centers on Hanna, a teenager who takes her own life due to a series of events. She leaves behind a series of cassette tapes to explain what led to her suicide and the role others played in driving her to that point. Here’s the goodreads.com summary:

The #1 New York Times bestseller and modern classic that’s been changing lives for a decade.

You can’t stop the future.
You can’t rewind the past.
The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play.

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker–his classmate and crush–who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why.

Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever.

The series is not for tweens. It’s definitely for a more mature audience and should be discussed to help the students process what they’re seeing. This is a realistic expression of the rawness of teen life so there’s quite of bit of language, mature content, implied sex, rape, self-injury, and suicide. The book and the series aims to address the difficult issues adolescents face daily and it will be hard for parents and adults to watch or to believe life can be like this.

The topics addressed in the series have long been the focus of Conversations on the Fringe. Here’s a list of links to the topics explored on the show that we’ve written about:

Suicide

Depression

Bullying

Self-Injury

Dating Violence

Sexting

Look for more resources in the next couple weeks on 13 Reasons Why. We’ll be interviewing students, releasing a discussion guide, and will continue to explore themes addressed in the book/series. If your kids aren’t watching this already, they are talking about it daily with their friends that have seen it. Use this opportunity to lean into the difficult issues your teens might be facing but are often so hard to talk about.

Not In My School: Anti-Bullying Program


NOT IN MY SCHOOL: Anti-Bullying Program helps to nurture safe school and social environments through empathy and character development by equipping students with skills to increase emotional and social intelligence.

Each year approximately 30% of students worldwide are the target of bullying. If these kids were adults, their behavior would be called assault and punishable by the law.

Bullying is different from just playing around or peer conflict. It occurs when a student, or group of students, repeatedly hurt or humiliate another student or group of students.  Bullying and harassment often cause lasting physical and mental harm, marginalize diverse students and negatively impact the entire school culture.

NOT IN MY SCHOOL: Anti-Bullying Program is designed to enhance and improve student relations and nurture a culture of safety and positive learning for young people to develop.

Our goals are:

  1. decrease existing bullying problems
  2. prevent new bullying problems
  3. enhance student relations with peers, teachers, and the school through emotional and social learning strategies

What is social and emotional learning (SEL)?
Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process through which children and adults acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions.

What does emotional and social intelligence look like?
Emotional and social intelligence can increase in each of the four core areas:

  • Self-awareness. Students become increasingly aware of their emotions, interests and values, and accurately assess their strengths and capacities. They have a solid sense of self-esteem and a strong belief in their ability to create a positive future.
  • Self-management. Students develop a greater mastery over their thoughts, emotions, impulses, and motivation.
  • Social-awareness. Students increase in empathy towards others, as well as a recognition of the differences in others. They are also able to identify supportive relationships and resources.
  • Relationship-management.  Students develop conflict resolution skills, how to set and maintain boundaries, and problem solve relationship challenges, as well as when and how to ask for help.

As a results, students will have a greater sense of belonging and connection to their peers, teachers, school, and community, therefore reducing the risk of aggressive or maladaptive behaviors, such as; bullying, self-injury, unhealthy sexual behaviors, and substance abuse.

For more information about bringing NOT IN MY SCHOOL: Anti-Bullying Program to your school contact us at:

NOT IN MY SCHOOL: Anti-Bullying Program

P.O. Box 74

Delavan, Illinois 61734

Phone: 309.360.6115

Email: cschaffner@fringeconversations.com

Other Fringe youth development programs:

RealTalk Drug Prevention Program

True North Student Leadership Initiatives

 

 

 

 

Trauma-Informed Youth Ministry


I went to a training on creating trauma-informed systems of care. I was impacted by the implications on schools and youth ministries. People often look to the church for hope in the midst of tragedy. The church can be a place of good news and healing if they take steps to be trauma-informed in what they do.

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Trauma studies report 70% of all adults have experienced some form of trauma. Trauma experiences can range from a simple car accident that results in injury, to gang violence in the city, to physical or sexual assault, to repeated name calling, to being in high stress environments such as jail or prison. 90% of those people suffering from trauma end up in public behavioral health systems seeking support and therapy. 70% of teens who seek treatment for addiction report having traumatic experiences in their young lives, often repeated trauma. New research has revealed trauma can actually derail normal development of the body, brain, and cognition.

SAMHSA (2012) reports “individuals can be retraumatized by those whose intent it is to help”. Trauma clearly interferes with healthy brain development and coping measure become problematic (i.e., substance use, avoidance, aggression, risky behaviors).

As we engage youth in our programs (especially schools and churches) we must understand the principles of trauma informed care.

Understanding attachment theory should be required for all who work with children and adolescents. Attachment theory is best explained as the type of connection (attachment) one has with their primary care givers as a child. When the infant/child is cared for and nurtured the growing infant develops a sense of security that their needs will be taken care of. As a result, the child will likely develop into an adolescent/young adult who is autonomous, self-controlled emotionally and behaviorally, well-formed identity, and can adapt to changing circumstances.

A child who experiences high levels of stress or trauma is more likely to develop insecure or avoidant attachment styles of interacting with the world around them. If they are victimized, they will likely be extra weary of people and see the world as unsafe. Due to this worldview, the child has to develop maladaptive ways to interact with the dangerous world they live in.

When a child experiences trauma the architecture of the brain is changed and emotions and cognition are not integrated. The separate regions of the brain do not communicate effectively with one another so, when something triggers a memory of trauma that fear signal cannot be challenged with rational thought because the pathways have been disrupted. This means everything is a potential trigger for re-activating the trauma.

One example of this is when a young person, that has been sexually abused and threatened or coerced into not reporting the abuse, is told by a well-meaning youth worker that she cannot have her cell phone on the retreat away from home. The reason for this is so the student can focus on God without the distraction of modern mobile technology. Unfortunately, a trauma-impacted student may experience this as a loss of safety that reignites the feeling of being powerless to call for help if needed.

Children and youth are vulnerable populations but there are intersections that increase their vulnerability because we live in a society that marginalizes anyone that is different from the norm (i.e., LGBT, people of color, disables, gender, religion, class, etc.). The greater the number of identity intersections the higher the likelihood of victimization and trauma. Think about the homeless black teenage girl who was kicked out of her house because she identifies as a lesbian. She also recently dropped out of school because she has a learning disability. Now, in order to survive on the streets, she resorts to survival sex with strangers just for a warm bed and a hot meal. This is traumatizing if it happens just once but for many marginalized youth, this becomes a way of life.

If a young person is handled with care, healing can occur. Our school or church can help this precious child begin the healing by creating a trauma informed program or ministry. This starts by educating staff and volunteers. Bring a local therapist, who specializes in trauma, to speak to your team about the impact of trauma and how to be more informed as a team. There are also plenty of resources on the web. Conversations on the Fringe has several blog posts dedicated to trauma.

Another way we can help a hurting student is by creating safe spaces for them to walk with Jesus. Their journey may not be as linear as most of their peers. Cultivating an environment for vulnerability is of the utmost importance but remembering the classroom or youth ministry room is no replacement for a qualified and trained therapist.

Trauma impacts whole family systems. They will need support as they begin the journey to freedom and healing. Trauma alienates and can lead to isolation for families who are ashamed, embarrassed, overwhelmed, and hurting themselves. They need your friendship more than anything. Be present. Sit quietly. Cry with them. Bring meals to families sorting out their trauma stories. Incarnate real love and support. Prayer is good and essential but no replacement for a hug or wiping away tears or a warm dinner.

Lastly, creating a trauma-informed program is a justice issue. If a traumatized young person is to ever recovery a sense of goodness and justice in the world, if they are ever to let go of the natural anxiety of being victimized and move out into the world a whole-hearted person, they need to know and experience goodness that brings balance to their life. Trauma leaves such a powerful and deep impact on the mind and soul that it will take good people doing good to re-establish equilibrium to their mind and soul. The issue of justice cannot be avoided in human service or ministry organization because, it is the heart of why people seek help for trauma in the first place.

What does justice work look like for victims of trauma? What does it look like for perpetrators of trauma?

RealTalk Drug Prevention Program


Real talk about real issues.

RealTalk Drug Prevention Programs are geared towards those who wish to have honest conversations about drugs and alcohol. RealTalk does not rely on fear as a motivator for youth to make wise choices. We operate from the belief that no child ever dreams of growing up to become a drug addict or alcoholic. That fundamental belief drives our believe that youth, when armed with good and honest information, make good choices. Our goal is to provide the “bigger picture” when it comes to drug use and misuse.

We offer services for consultation, speaking/presentations, churches, school assemblies, health class curriculum, community events, and coalition support.

We offer programs for the following:

Students

We provide experiential and engaging educational opportunities for youth of all ages, K – 12, and even into college. We talk to students (at age-appropriate levels) on the following subjects:

  • Basic Drug Education
  • Understanding Your Brain
  • Why Choices Matter and How to Make Good Ones
  • Navigating Peer Pressure
  • Refusal Skills
  • Bullying (bullies, bystanders, and victims)
  • Secret Scars (self-injury)
  • Cultural and Media Influences (discerning popular culture messages)
  • Dealing with a Stressful Home
  • Building Strong Bonds with Parents
  • Developing Coping Skills
  • Living with a Family Member who Struggles with Addiction

Parents

Being a parent is already challenging enough without a child who struggles with drug use. Does tough love really work? Is this just a phase they are going through? If I ignore it will it go away or should I clamp down hard now to keep this from getting out of hand?

Our parenting program will help parents evaluate the systemic causes driving the drug/alcohol use while increasing the likelihood that youth who haven’t started using, won’t.

We focus on the follow:

  • How do I talk to my child/youth/teen about drugs and alcohol
  • What are risk factors
  • What are signs and symptoms of substance abuse
  • Hidden in Plain Sight (a way to evaluate your teen’s room for signs of drug use)
  • Creating a united front between both parents
  • Setting Boundaries
  • When do I seek help (i.e., treatment, counseling, 12 step)
  • Is this my fault?
  • How do I support my sober child without enabling him/her/they

Schools

RealTalk is one of the premiere middle/high school assembly programs in the country. Our speakers use current evidence-based prevention research in their presentations. If you are looking for a dynamic and engaging speaker/presentation for your school assembly, we can work with you to address a variety of topics.

Community

We get asked to speak to community groups all the time. There is a need and desire to know more about issues like the heroin/prescription opiate epidemic, naloxone overdose reversal training, current drug trends, and best practices for youth drug prevention. Here are just some of the topics we cover in our community education presentations:

  • Current Drug Trends
  • The Problem of Heroin and Youth
  • Safeguarding Your Medication
  • Asset-Based Youth Prevention
  • Risk-Factors vs. Protective Factors
  • Interventions That Work
  • Coalition Building
  • Creating Support for Youth in Recovery

Contact us today at RealTalk Drug Prevention Programs.

Other Fringe youth development programs:

True North Student Leadership Initiatives

NOT MY SCHOOL: Anti-Bullying Program

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