The War On Kids: How American Juvenile Justice Lost Its Way 

“Dramatically and rapidly, though, the United States became an international outliner in the severity of its juvenile sentencing practices. Each year in America, police arrest more than one million juveniles, and about 250,000 of those kids are charged with a crime and processed in adult court. In some states, children as young as six can be transferred out of juvenile court into adult court without any judicial oversight. Once there, they face sentences – often mandatory ones – that were drafted with adults in mind. If convicted, these children are sentenced to a term of years in a correctional facility fraught with problems, not the least of which is that it was designed for adults. Until 2005, the United States was the only developed country that subjected children to the death penalty, and today we are the only nation that employs juvenile life without parole. Because of their physical and mental vulnerability, youth inmates experience the highest rates of sexual and physical assault, as well as suicide. The Pope, U.N. officials, and international human rights organizations have condemned American juvenile sentencing practices.

So how did we abandon the groundbreaking model of juvenile justice that we constructed only a little more than a century ago?”

 

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